Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (2022)

Twin Cities campus

Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (1)

Twin Cities Campus

Psychology

College of Liberal Arts

  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54 to 61
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science

For millennia, our survival as human beings has depended on our ability to understand and predict others’ behaviors. Today, personal and professional success continues to depend on understanding and predicting human experiences and behavior. Psychology is the scientific study of these experiences and behaviors. Given humans’ imposing complexity, psychologists employ a range of perspectives, including evolutionary, biological, social, organizational, institutional, and sociocultural. In turn, these perspectives influence psychologists’ levels of explanation, from genetics to brain physiology, personality, individual differences, social interactions and group memberships, the institutions that we inhabit, and the cultures in which we spend our lives. Like all liberal arts disciplines, psychology addresses human experience, but what makes psychology unique as a scientific discipline are the concepts that psychologists use to make sense of people and the methods that they use to learn more about them.Our baccalaureate programs provide students with a strong general background in all areas of psychology and withthe ability to think and reason critically in a wide variety of settings. All psychology students complete three critical courses essential to achieve those goals: PSY 1001 (Introduction to Psychology) provides a broad overview of what psychologists know about human behavior; PSY 3001W (Introduction to Research Methods) focuses on the skills necessary to generate new knowledge; and PSY 3801 (Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis) addresses the skills necessary to test hypotheses using statistical methods. Students will complete additional courses focused on their individual interests, and even if they never plan to become psychological scientists, students will develop the skills needed throughout their lives to be sophisticated evaluators of psychological information and to navigate the complexities of human behavior.The B.S. degree emphasizes outside coursework closely related to biological and quantitative psychology, including fields such as neuroscience, cognitive and computer science, biology, chemistry, and mathematics. The B.S. prepares students for graduate work in psychology and related fields, and we encourage students interested in the biological, genetic, or evolutionary underpinnings of human behavior to complete outside courses in the life sciences, including biology, chemistry, and evolution. We encourage students interested in quantitative approaches and the cognitive underpinnings of human behavior to complete outside courses in mathematics, statistics, and computer science. A B.S. degree in psychology provides a valuable background for a variety of careers and graduate and professional academic programs, including psychology, medicine, neuroscience, and computer science. A professional career as a psychologist requires training beyond the baccalaureate degree.

Program Delivery

This program is available:

  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)

Admission Requirements

Prospective majors are strongly encouraged to complete PSY 3801 (or a Department of Psychology approved equivalent transfer course) and two Outside Foundation Courses prior to formally declaring the major. To declare a major, students first complete the Online Declaration Module (https://cla.umn.edu/psychology/undergraduate/majors-minors/declare-your-major) and then schedule an appointment with a psychology advisor (psyadvis@umn.edu).

For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.

General Requirements

All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).

Program Requirements

At least 16 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn no more than one undergraduate degree in psychology: a BA or a BS or a minor. Students may combine the psychology BS with the developmental psychology minor, but not with the developmental psychology BA or BS. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) students earning a BA, BS, or BIS degree must complete the second-year career management course CLA 3002.All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an additional degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.

Outside Foundation Courses

Take 18 or more credit(s) including 3 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:

Philosophy

Take 0 - 11 credit(s) from the following:

· PHIL1005-Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)

· PHIL3601W-Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PHIL3607-Philosophy of Psychology (4.0 cr)

· PHIL5201-Symbolic Logic I (4.0 cr)

· PHIL5202-Symbolic Logic II (4.0 cr)

· PHIL1001-Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or PHIL1001H-Honors Course: Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· PHIL3605-Disease, Diagnosis, and Intervention: Conceptual Issues in Medicine (3.0 cr)

or PHIL4607-Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3.0 cr)

· Computer Science/Math

Take 0 - 11 credit(s) from the following:

· CSCI1103-Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)

· CSCI1113-Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)

· MATH1142-Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH1241-Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH1271-Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH1371-CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH1571H-Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH2243-Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)

· MATH2263-Multivariable Calculus (4.0 cr)

· CSCI1133-Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)

or CSCI1133H-Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)

· CSCI1933-Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)

or CSCI1933H-Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)

or CSCI1913-Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development (4.0 cr)

· CSCI2011-Discrete Structures of Computer Science (4.0 cr)

or CSCI2011H-Honors Discrete Structures of Computer Science (4.0 cr)

· MATH1142-Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or MATH1241-Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· MATH1272-Calculus II (4.0 cr)

or MATH1372-CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)

or MATH1572H-Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)

· Physical Science

Take 0 - 11 credit(s) from the following:

· CHEM1015-Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

· CHEM1017-Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM1061-Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1065-Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

or CHEM1071H-Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1075H-Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

or CHEM1081-Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1065-Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM1062-Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1066-Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

or CHEM1072H-Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1076H-Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

· CHEM1082-Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)

with CHEM1086-Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)

· CHEM2081-Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)

with CHEM2085-Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)

· CHEM2301-Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)

or CHEM2331H-Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)

· CHEM2302-Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)

or CHEM2332H-Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)

· CHEM2311-Organic Lab (4.0 cr)

or CHEM2312H-Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)

· PHYS1101W-Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1107-Introductory Physics Online I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

· PHYS1102W-Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1108-Introductory Physics Online II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

· PHYS1221-Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1301W-Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1401V-Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

· PHYS1222-Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1302W-Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1402V-Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

· Biological Science

Take 0 - 11 credit(s) from the following:

· ANTH1001-Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

· BIOL1101-Genetics and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)

· EEB3409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

· NSCI3101-Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)

· NSCI3505W-Mind and Brain [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PHSL3051-Human Physiology (4.0 cr)

· PHSL3061-Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)

· ANTH3002-Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)

or EEB3002-Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)

· ANTH4329-Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

or EEB4329-Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

· BIOC3021-Biochemistry (3.0 cr)

or BIOC3022-Biochemistry for Life Scientists (3.0 cr)

BIOL1001-Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1001H-Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1003-Evolution and Biology of Sex [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

· BIOL1009-General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1009H-Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

· BIOL1951H-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1951-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

with BIOL1961-Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)

· BIOL4003-Genetics (3.0 cr)

or GCD3022-Genetics (3.0 cr)

· BIOL4004-Cell Biology (3.0 cr)

or GCD3033-Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)

· EEB3411-Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)

or EEB3412W-Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)

or EEB3811W-Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)

· NSCI2001-Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab) (3.0 cr)

or NSCI2101-Human Neuroanatomy [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

Major Courses

Take 36 or more total credits including: Foundation Courses, Distribution Area Courses, Senior Project and any Electives needed to reach the minimum 36 credits in Psychology coursework. 3 Foundation Courses, 5 Distribution Area Courses, and Capstone are all required.

Foundation Courses

Take exactly 3 course(s) from the following:

· PSY1001-Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)

or PSY1001H-Honors Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)

· PSY3801-Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or PSY3801H-Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· PSY3001W-Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)

or PSY3001V-Honors Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)

Distribution Area Courses

At least one course in Distribution Area courses must be at the 4xxx level or above, excluding: CPSY 4303, PSY 4902V, 4960, 4993, 4994V, 4996H, 5960, & 5993. Students should take additional Psychology courses from the Distribution Areas lists or the list of "Additional Elective Options" to reach the 36 credit minimum for the major.

Take 5 or more course(s) from the following:

Distribution Area A: Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:

· PSY3011-Introduction to Learning and Behavior (3.0 cr)

· PSY3031-Introduction to Sensation and Perception (3.0 cr)

· PSY3051-Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3061-Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY4021-Creativity Sciences: Minds, Brains, and Innovation (3.0 cr)

· PSY4032-Psychology of Music (3.0 cr)

· PSY4036-Perceptual Issues in Visual Impairment (3.0 cr)

· PSY5014-Psychology of Human Learning and Memory (3.0 cr)

· PSY5015-Cognition, Computation, and Brain (3.0 cr)

· PSY5018H-Mathematical Models of Human Behavior (3.0 cr)

· PSY5031W-Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY5036W-Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY5037-Psychology of Hearing (3.0 cr)

· PSY5038W-Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY5052-Psychology of Attention (3.0 cr)

· PSY5054-Psychology of Language (3.0 cr)

· PSY5062-Cognitive Neuropsychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY5063-Introduction to Functional MRI (3.0 cr)

· PSY5064-Brain and Emotion (3.0 cr)

· PSY5065-Functional Imaging: Hands-on Training (3.0 cr)

· PSY5066-Neuroscience, Philosophy and Ethics (3.0 cr)

· Distibution Area B: Clinical, Personality, and Social

Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:

· CPSY4303-Adolescent Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3101-Introduction to Personality (3.0 cr)

· PSY3201-Introduction to Social Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3206-Introduction to Health Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3301-Introduction to Cultural Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3604-Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3617-Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3633-Happiness: Integrating Research Across Psychological Sciences (3.0 cr)

· PSY3666-Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)

· PSY4206-Interventions for Health and Wellness (3.0 cr)

· PSY4301-Psychology & Diversity Science (3.0 cr)

· PSY5101H-Honors: Personality: Current Theory and Research (3.0 cr)

· PSY5202-Attitudes and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

· PSY5204-Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships (3.0 cr)

· PSY5205-Applied Social Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY5206-Social Psychology and Health Behavior (3.0 cr)

· PSY4207-Personality and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

or PSY5207-Personality and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

· CPSY3301-Introduction to Developmental Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)

CPSY3301H-Honors Introduction to Developmental Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)

· Distribution Area C: Individual Differences, Quantitative, and Applied

Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:

· PSY3121-History and Systems of Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3511-Introduction to Counseling Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY3711-Psychology in the Workplace (3.0 cr)

· PSY4501-Psychology of Women and Gender (3.0 cr)

· PSY4521-Psychology of Stress and Trauma (3.0 cr)

· PSY5136-Human Abilities (3.0 cr)

· PSY5137-Introduction to Behavioral Genetics (3.0 cr)

· PSY5501-Self, Society and Health - What's Work Got To Do With It? (3.0 cr)

· PSY5708-Organizational Psychology (3.0 cr)

· PSY5862-Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)

· PSY5865-Advanced Measurement: Theory and Application (3.0 cr)

· PSY5701-Employee Selection and Staffing (3.0 cr)

· PSY5703-Psychology of Organizational Training and Development (3.0 cr)

· PSY3135-Introduction to Individual Differences (3.0 cr)

or PSY5135-Psychology of Individual Differences (3.0 cr)

· Additional Elective Options

Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:

Take at most 3 credit(s) from the following:

· PSY3960-Undergraduate Seminar in Psychology (1.0-5.0 cr)

· PSY3896-Internship in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· PSY3993-Directed Study (1.0-6.0 cr)

· PSY3996-Undergraduate Fieldwork and Internship in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· PSY4960-Seminar in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· PSY5960-Topics in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· Students may count up to 6 credits of PSY 4993/5993 toward the electives sub-requirement. Three credits of directed research must be concurrent or no more than one semester prior to Psy 3901W - Capstone in Psychology.

Take at most 6 credit(s) from the following:

· CPSY4994-Directed Research in Developmental Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· PSY4993-Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences (1.0-6.0 cr)

· PSY5993-Research Laboratory in Psychology (3.0 cr)

Capstone

Students demonstrate analytic skills and an understanding of the modes of inquiry common to psychology. The capstone synthesizes knowledge gained over the program of study.Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the Psychology BS capstone.

General Sequence

Take PSY 4993, PSY 5993, or CPSY 4994 one semester prior to, or concurrent with PSY 3901W.

Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:

· PSY3901W-Capstone in Psychology - Research Laboratory [WI] (3.0 cr)

· CPSY4994-Directed Research in Developmental Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)

or PSY4993-Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences (1.0-6.0 cr)

or PSY5993-Research Laboratory in Psychology (3.0 cr)

or Honors Sequence

Students who fulfill the Capstone requirement with PSY 4902V must take PSY 4994V as a prerequisite. PSY 4994V is typically taken in the Spring semester of Junior year. Students should plan this sequence with Psychology Advising and Psychology Honors faculty. Students must enroll in PSY 4902V for a minimum of 3, but no more than 6 credits.

Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 7 - 10 credit(s) from the following:

· PSY4994V-Honors Research Practicum [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PSY4902V-Honors Project [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major

Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.

Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:

· PSY3001V-Honors Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PSY3001W-Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PSY3901W-Capstone in Psychology - Research Laboratory [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY3902W-Capstone in Psychology - Individual Interests [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY4902V-Honors Project [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

· PSY4994V-Honors Research Practicum [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PSY5031W-Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY5036W-Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PSY5038W-Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)

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Information current as of November 24, 2022

PHIL1005 - Scientific Reasoning

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1005/Phil 1005H
Typically offered: Every Fall

How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills.prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent

PHIL3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Science influences us daily, shaping how we understand ourselves and interpret nature. This course is an introduction to how scientists reason about the world, what that means for our lives, and the status of science as a human activity.What is science and what?s so great about it? Is science the ultimate authority on the world and our place in it? This course examines the authority of science, how scientists reason, and science?s status as a human activity.prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science

PHIL3607 - Philosophy of Psychology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

What are minds and mental states (like desires and beliefs)? How are these different from brains and brain states? Should scientific explanation abandon any appeal to the mental (like behaviorism) or can we offer a scientific account of mind?prereq: One course in philosophy or psychology

PHIL5201 - Symbolic Logic I

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Study of syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Symbolization of natural-language sentences and arguments. Development of deductive systems for first-order logic. Metatheoretic proofs and methods, including proof by mathematical induction and proof of consistency and completeness.prereq: 1001 or instr consent

PHIL5202 - Symbolic Logic II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Elements of set theory, including the concepts of enumerability and nonenumerability. Turing machines and recursive functions; the results of Church, Godel, and Tarski and the philosophical significance of those results.prereq: 5201 or instr consent

PHIL1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.

PHIL1001H - Honors Course: Introduction to Logic (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.

PHIL3605 - Disease, Diagnosis, and Intervention: Conceptual Issues in Medicine

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Contemporary medicine dominates our daily concerns and societal conversation. From insurance coverage to the consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals, the variety of issues and their visibility is patently obvious. However, conceptual issues in medicine, such as what counts as health and disease or what do we mean by "evidence-based" or "precision" medicine, are arguably just as important--if not prior to--many of these other issues. For example, if doctors do not consider something an "official" disease or condition, it is unlikely your insurance company will pay to treat it. Additional conceptual questions include: what role do theories play in medicine? Can scientific experiments be replicated in clinical medicine? Should all medicine be based on evidence? How do we know what causes health or disease? What do advances in neuroscience reveal about the relationship between mind and body, especially with respect to mental health and illness? What properties do physicians measure and why? How does probability and chance enter into medical practice (e.g., diagnosis, therapy, and rehabilitation)?This course is an introduction to these and other related issues in medicine with an emphasis on their diversity and heterogeneity. It is designed for undergraduates across a variety of majors with an interest in these conceptual questions, including but not limited to Animal Science; Anthropology; Biochemistry; Biology, Society and Environment; Chemistry; Ecology, Evolution and Behavior; Genetics, Cell Biology and Development; Microbiology; Neuroscience; Physiology; Psychology). No prior knowledge of medicine or philosophy is required; I do not assume that you have any previous exposure to the material we will be covering.Most of the assignments for this course are writing oriented. The goal is to identify, characterize, and critically reflect on the issues raised in our discussions and do this in the medium of writing. At the end of the class you will possess new analytical skills and recognize the value of philosophical investigation into the medical concepts and practices, including its application to your everyday life. Additionally, it is directly relevant to the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills portion of the MCAT.

PHIL4607 - Philosophy of the Biological Sciences

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4607/Phil 5607
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Biology dominates the landscape of contemporary scientific research, and yet "biology" consists of a variety of different disciplinary approaches: from protein biochemistry to field ecology, from developmental biology to evolutionary genetics. Many philosophical issues can be found in the concepts and practices of life science researchers from these different disciplines. What is the structure of evolutionary theory? What is a gene? What are the units of selection? What is an individual? What counts as a "cause"? What is the relationship between evolution and development? Are all biological phenomena reducible to genes or molecules? What are adaptations, and how do we identify them? What is an ecological niche? Is there a progressive trend in the history of life? Is there such a thing as 'human nature'? This course is an introduction to these and other related issues in the biological sciences with an emphasis on their diversity and heterogeneity. It is designed for advanced undergraduates with an interest in conceptual questions and debates in biology that are manifested across a variety of majors (e.g., animal science; anthropology; biochemistry; biology, society and environment; biosystems and agricultural engineering; chemistry; ecology, evolution and behavior; genetics, cell biology and development; microbiology; neuroscience; physiology; plant biology; psychology). Some of these issues will appear familiar from previous coursework or opportunities, whereas new issues will be intriguing because of their similarities and differences with those that have been encountered in other contexts.

CSCI1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.

CSCI1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields.prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent

MATH1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications.prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]

MATH1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry.prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student

MATH1271 - Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems.prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]

MATH1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning.prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended

MATH1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory.prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program

MATH2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients.prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-

MATH2263 - Multivariable Calculus

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/Math 2374/Math 2573H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Derivative as linear map. Differential/integral calculus of functions of several variables, including change of coordinates using Jacobians. Line/surface integrals. Gauss, Green, Stokes Theorems.prereq: [1272 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-

CSCI1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent

CSCI1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Programming concepts using Python language. Real world problem solving, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Abstractions/modularity. Optional honors topics: programming robots, programming paradigms, artificial intelligence.prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H], CSci majors, pre-majors in CSE/CLA, honors student

CSCI1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab.prereq: 1133 or instr consent

CSCI1933H - Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. Optional honors topics: Advanced Java topics, GUI programming, CS research examples.prereq: [1133 or 1133H] and honors student, or inst consent

CSCI1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types(stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Scripting languages using Python language. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.prereq: (EE major and EE 1301) or (CmpE major and EE 1301) or 1103 or 1113 or instr consent

CSCI2011 - Discrete Structures of Computer Science

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 2011/CSci 2011H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Foundations of discrete mathematics. Sets, sequences, functions, big-O, propositional/predicate logic, proof methods, counting methods, recursion/recurrences, relations, trees/graph fundamentals.prereq: MATH 1271 or MATH 1371 or instr consent

CSCI2011H - Honors Discrete Structures of Computer Science

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 2011/CSci 2011H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Foundations of discrete mathematics. Sets, sequences, functions, big-O, propositional/predicate logic, proofmethods, counting methods, recursion/recurrences, relations, trees/graph fundamentals. Advanced topics in discrete structures as time permits.prereq: [MATH 1271 or MATH 1371 or MATH 1571H], honors student.

MATH1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications.prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]

MATH1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry.prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student

MATH1272 - Calculus II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates.prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-

MATH1372 - CSE Calculus II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring

Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning.prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr

MATH1572H - Honors Calculus II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra.prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program

CHEM1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended;Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.

CHEM1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving.prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)

CHEM1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use.Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals.prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H

CHEM1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.

CHEM1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall

The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields.prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry.prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062

CHEM1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062

CHEM1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry.prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H

CHEM1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H

CHEM1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields.prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM2301 - Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules.prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H

CHEM2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules.prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student

CHEM2302 - Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids.prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301

CHEM2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids.prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student

CHEM2311 - Organic Lab

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies.prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302

CHEM2312H - Honors Organic Lab

Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Honors organic chemistry lab.prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent

PHYS1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab.prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas

PHYS1107 - Introductory Physics Online I (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall

Principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles together with quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena.prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry

PHYS1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PHYS 1102W / PHYS 1108
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab.prereq: 1101W or 1107

PHYS1108 - Introductory Physics Online II (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PHYS 1102W / PHYS 1108
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena.prereq: 1107; primarily for students interested in technical areas

PHYS1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus.prereq: High School or College Calculus

PHYS1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems.Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent

PHYS1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent

PHYS1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered.prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent

PHYS1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena.Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent

PHYS1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena.Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent

ANTH1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.

BIOL1101 - Genetics and Society (CIV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Principles of heredity and their social and cultural implications.prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: BIOL 3020, Biol 4003, GCD 3022. No CBS Major Juniors or Seniors.

EEB3409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

NSCI3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites.

NSCI3505W - Mind and Brain (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course is intended as an introduction to the new views on the relationship between mind and brain. Over the last several decades, a new view of cognition and neural processing has been developed based on the concepts of al¬gorithm, representation, computation, and information processing. Within this theoretical frame¬work, psychological constructs are computational processes occur¬ring across physical neural systems. We will take a neuroscience and psychological perspective in which the physical neuroscience instantiates but does not diminish the psychological constructs. Although our conceptual framework will be computational, this course will not require or expect any mathematical or computer background. At the completion of this class, you will understand the implications of the physical nature of the brain ? how mentation is explicable from physical processes, and how decision-making arises from those same physical processes. Importantly, you will also understand the limitations of current knowledge and the methodologies being used to push those limitations. This class is not intended as a final step in this understanding, but as a first step into these issues. At the conclusion of the class, you should have sufficient understanding to continue more in-depth reading and study in these issues. There are no official prerequisites. However, I have found that students who have EITHER a strong computational background (computer science, mathematics, economics, physics) OR have taken an introductory neuroscience course (e.g. Nsci 2100) have done better in the class than students with no background. However, I have seen students come in with very little background and do well in the class if they engage with the class and work hard.

PHSL3051 - Human Physiology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3050/Phsl 3051
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab.prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem

PHSL3061 - Principles of Physiology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3063/Phsl 3071
Typically offered: Every Fall

Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology.prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus

ANTH3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.

EEB3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.

ANTH4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture.prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent

EEB4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture.prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent

BIOC3021 - Biochemistry

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.

BIOC3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists

Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course provides an introduction to biochemistry including discussion of the structure and functions of biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), central metabolic pathways, and the mechanisms of enzyme action.This course is intended for students in the College of Biological Sciences. Students from other colleges should register for BIOC 3021.prereq: CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent

BIOL1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.

BIOL1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.

BIOL1003 - Evolution and Biology of Sex (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course is designed as a one-semester exploration of biology from the standpoint of the evolution and biology of sex. It emphasizes scientific processes, evolution, sexual behavior, reproductive biology, and diversity with respect to sexual orientation, reproductive strategies, and gender identity. Lab activities complement these topics. This course does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.

BIOL1009 - General Biology (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.

BIOL1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.

BIOL1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS honors students

BIOL1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

BIOL1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

BIOL4003 - Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations.prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad

GCD3022 - Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems.prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009

BIOL4004 - Cell Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells.prereq: Completion of Biol 4003 is preferred, Biol2003/2003H or Biol4003 or grad

GCD3033 - Principles of Cell Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors.prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv

EEB3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Typically offered: Every Fall

This course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: ?Why is that animal doing that?? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. The lecture parallels a required laboratory.prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions.prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a fieldstation, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study ofanimal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicateto one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both ofthese. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independentresearch project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade.This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period inMay/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

NSCI2001 - Human Neuroanatomy (without a lab)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSci 2001/NSci 2100
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course will provide a broad introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on the human nervous system. The course will introduce the structure and function of neurons, the major anatomical parts of the nervous system and the main functional systems. Functional systems will be approached through an understanding of the anatomical circuitry. The fundamental concepts of neurochemical communication studied in general terms in the first part of the course will be re-examined relative to specific functional systems later in the course. Although the major focus of the course will be on the normal nervous system, common diseases will be introduced for each main topic. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of many neurological diseases, which will provide further insight into how the normal nervous system functions. The neuronal substrates of learning/memory, addiction and drug actions will be examined. Through the lectures, discussions and other resources, students will be expected to gain an understanding of the neural circuitry and information processing responsible for the diverse range of human behaviors.The material covered in Nsci 2001 and 2100 is very similar. N2100 is taught only fall semester. It is a traditional lecture course that includes a weekly laboratory. The faculty believe that the laboratory is a valuable part of the course. N2001 is taught only spring semester for those who cannot take the fall course. It does not have a lab, but has the advantage of a flipped format. In N2001, students will be expected to watch the assigned lectures prior to coming to class. Class time will be spent on exercises and discussions that use the material presented in the online lectures. Students who take one of these two courses will not be allowed to take the other course.For more information, see http://mcloonlab.neuroscience.umn.edu/2001/index.htm

NSCI2101 - Human Neuroanatomy (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSci 2001/NSci 2100
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

This course will provide a broad introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on the human nervous system. The course will introduce the structure and function of neurons, the major anatomical parts of the nervous system and the main functional systems. Functional systems will be approached through an understanding of the anatomical circuitry. The fundamental concepts of neurochemical communication studied in general terms in the first part of the course will be re-examined relative to specific functional systems later in the course. Although the major focus of the course will be on the normal nervous system, common diseases will be introduced for each main topic. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of many neurological diseases, which will provide further insight into how the normal nervous system functions. The neuronal substrates of learning/memory, addiction and drug actions will be examined. Through the lectures, laboratory exercises and other resources, students will be expected to gain an understanding of the neural circuitry and information processing responsible for the diverse range of human behaviors. The material covered in Nsci 2001 and 2100 is very similar. N2100 is taught only fall semester. It is a traditional lecture course that includes a weekly laboratory. The faculty believe that the laboratory is a valuable part of the course. N2001 is taught only spring semester for those who cannot take the fall course. It does not have a lab, but has the advantage of a flipped format. In N2001, students will be expected to watch the assigned lectures prior to coming to class. Class time will be spent on exercises and discussions that use the material presented in the online lectures. Students who take one of these two courses will not be allowed to take the other course. For more information, see http://mcloonlab.neuroscience.umn.edu/2100/index.htm

PSY1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.

PSY1001H - Honors Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.prereq: Honors

PSY3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software.prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology

PSY3801H - Honors Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Descriptive/basic inferential statistics in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software.prereq: [1001 or equiv], high school algebra, honors; intended for students who plan to major in psychology

PSY3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims.prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent

PSY3001V - Honors Introduction to Research Methods (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims.prereq: [1001, [2081/3801 or equiv]]or dept consent, PSY major, honors student

PSY3011 - Introduction to Learning and Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Methods/findings of research on learning and behavior change. Twentieth-century theoretical perspectives, including contemporary models. Emphasizes animal learning and behavioral psychology.prereq: 1001

PSY3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3031/Psy 3031
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Psychological, biological, and physical bases of sensory experience in humans and animals. Emphasizes senses of vision/hearing.prereq: PSY 1001

PSY3051 - Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3051 / CGSC 5051
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Scientific study of the mind in terms of representation and processing of information. Research and theory on cognitive abilities such as perception, attention, memory, language, and reasoning. Aspects of computational modeling and neural systems.prereq: 1001

PSY3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse.prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100

PSY4021 - Creativity Sciences: Minds, Brains, and Innovation

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Creativity and innovation play a pivotal role in our individual and collective lives. How do our minds, brains, and environments together enable the generation of useful novel ideas? This course investigates this question, using empirical findings and methods from the cognitive and brain sciences and other disciplines. Both close readings of original empirical research articles and active hands-on/minds-on within-class experiments and collaborative activities are core parts of the course. Two integrative themes throughout the course are the need for dynamically adaptive (contextually sensitive) variation in both levels of cognitive control and goal guidance (deliberate to spontaneous to automatic) and our level of representational specificity (concrete and specific to mid-level to abstract).prereq: Psy 1001

PSY4032 - Psychology of Music

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Sound, hearing, music perception. Cognitive neuroscience of music appreciation/production. Concepts in perception/production of sound/music. Music psychology topics. Recent primary research.prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent

PSY4036 - Perceptual Issues in Visual Impairment

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Challenges/capabilities of people who are blind or have low vision. Reading, space perception, mobility. Strengths/weaknesses of adaptive technology.prereq: 1001 or instr consent

PSY5014 - Psychology of Human Learning and Memory

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Human memory encoding/retrieval. How we adaptively use memory. Brain systems that support memory. Episodic/semantic memory. Working/short-term memory. Procedural memory. Repetition priming. Prospective remembering. Autobiographical memory.prereq: 3011 or 3051 or honors or grad student

PSY5015 - Cognition, Computation, and Brain

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Human cognitive abilities (perception, memory, attention) from different perspectives (e.g., cognitive psychological approach, cognitive neuroscience approach).prereq: [Honors or grad] or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent

PSY5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Mathematical models of complex human behavior, including individual/group decision making, information processing, learning, perception, and overt action. Specific computational techniques drawn from decision theory, information theory, probability theory, machine learning, and elements of data analysis.prereq: Math 1271 or instr consent

PSY5031W - Perception (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5031
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Topics include color vision, pattern vision, image formation in the eye, object recognition, reading, and impaired vision.prereq: 3031 or 3051 or instr consent

PSY5036W - Computational Vision (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year

Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control.prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent

PSY5037 - Psychology of Hearing

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc 5037/Psy 5037
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Biological and physical aspects of hearing, auditory psychophysics, theories and models of hearing, perception of complex sounds including music and speech. Clinical/other applications.Prereq: Instructor permission

PSY5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory.prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent

PSY5052 - Psychology of Attention

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Is attention needed for perception? Are we more likely to attend to locations associated with reward? Does brain training work? Are attention deficits at the root of autism spectrum disorders? This course will introduce students to advanced topics in the psychology of attention. It will combine didactic lecturing, instructor-led discussions, and student-led discussions on core topics of attention and its neural substrates. Students will acquire familiarity with theories, phenomena, and experimental paradigms of attention. prereq: Psy 3051 or equivalent

PSY5054 - Psychology of Language

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Theories/experimental evidence in past/present conceptions of psychology of language.prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent

PSY5062 - Cognitive Neuropsychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Consequences of different types of brain damage on human perception/cognition. Neural mechanisms of normal perceptual/cognitive functions. Vision/attention disorders, split brain, language deficits, memory disorders, central planning deficits. Emphasizes function/phenomenology. Minimal amount of brain anatomy.prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent

PSY5063 - Introduction to Functional MRI

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

How to understand and perform a brain imaging experiment. Theory and practice of functional MRI experimental design, execution, and data analysis. Students develop experimental materials/acquire and analyze their own functional MRI data. Lectures/lab exercises.prereq: Jr or sr or grad or instr consent

PSY5064 - Brain and Emotion

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Introduction to affective neuroscience. How brain promotes emotional/motivated behavior in animals/humans. Biological theories of emotion in historical/current theoretical contexts. Fundamental brain motivational systems, including fear, pleasure, attachment, stress, and regulation of motivated behavior. Implications for emotional development, vulnerability to psychiatric disorders.prereq: 3061 or 5061 or instr consent

PSY5065 - Functional Imaging: Hands-on Training

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Basic neuroimaging techniques/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). First half of semester covers basic physical principles. Second half students design/execute fMRI experiment on Siemens 3 Tesla scanner.prereq: [3801 or equiv], [3061 or NSCI 3101], instr consent

PSY5066 - Neuroscience, Philosophy and Ethics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Neuroscience increasingly allows us to explain the human experience in terms of mechanistic, electrochemical processes. The current course explores philosophical issues sparked by these developments in two modules. The first module examines the ways in which human neuroscience may shed new light on age-long philosophical quagmires such as mind-body dualism, free-will, and consciousness. For example, will neuroscience solve the mind-body problem by providing a wholly physical account of human nature? Is the neural view of decision making as a logical consequence of brain states incompatible with free-will? Can all of conscious experience (qualia) be reduced to neurobiology? The second module turns to neuro-ethical questions regarding the potential benefits and harms neuroscience might bring to the moral fabric of society.

CPSY4303 - Adolescent Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Overview of development in the teenage years/second decade of life. Interactions of adolescents with family, school, and society.prereq: PSY 1001 or equivalent

PSY3101 - Introduction to Personality

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Covers the major issues in personality psychology, including personality traits, their assessment, and their roots in genetic and environmental influences; personality development and the effects of personality on life outcomes; psychological and biological processes related to personality; and the importance of goals, roles, and narrative identity. Various contemporary and historical perspectives are considered, including psychodynamic, humanistic, behaviorist, and evolutionary approaches.prereq: 1001

PSY3201 - Introduction to Social Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Overview of theories/research in social psychology. Attitudes/persuasion, social judgment, the self, social influence, aggression, prejudice, helping, and applications.prereq: 1001 or instr consent

PSY3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3206/Psy 3206
Typically offered: Every Spring

Theories/research in health psychology. Bi-directional relationships between psychological factors and physical health. Stress/coping, adjustment to chronic illness. Psychological factors in etiology/course of disease. Health behavior change.prereq: 1001

PSY3301 - Introduction to Cultural Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Argn 3301/Madr 3301/Psy 3301
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Theories/research on how culture influences basic psychological processes (e.g., emotion, cognition, psychopathology) in domains that span different areas of psychology (e.g., social, clinical, developmental, industrial-organizational) and of other disciplines (e.g., anthropology, public health, sociology).prereq: 1001

PSY3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders.prereq: 1001

PSY3617 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Historical developments, contemporary issues. Trends in psychological assessment methods, intervention strategies, and clinical psychology research. Theories behind, empirical evidence for, usefulness of psychological intervention strategies.prereq: 3604 or 5604H

PSY3633 - Happiness: Integrating Research Across Psychological Sciences

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Nature of human happiness/fulfillment. Insights from cognitive, personality, and social psychology, and from biology and economics. Integrative approach to feelings that make life worth living.prereq: 3001W or 3001V or instr consent

PSY3666 - Human Sexuality

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Overview of theories, research, and contemporary issues in human sexual behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective. Sexual anatomy/physiology, hormones/sexual differentiation, cross-cultural perspectives on sexual development, social/health issues, and sexual dysfunction/therapy.prereq: 1001

PSY4206 - Interventions for Health and Wellness

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course explores empirically-tested psychological interventions to increase health and happiness. In the first part of the course, the focus will be on interventions to increase happiness, and students will test different strategies on themselves each week (as well as read the research literature on the strategies) as they attempt to increase happiness. In the second part of the course, students will select a health behavior, and then read about and test interventions (again on themselves) to change health behaviors, aiming to maintain a new health goal. A group project will involve creating an intervention to increase happiness on campus. Course consists of lecture, discussion, group work, and intervention design and testing. PSY 3206 is recommended, but not required.

PSY4301 - Psychology & Diversity Science

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

This is an advanced course for undergraduate students interested in research, theory, history, and practice related to psychological perspectives in Diversity Science. Diversity Science broadly pertains to understanding causes, consequences, and correlates of human group-based variations, in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, and the like. Students will learn how to adopt a scientific, analytic perspective on current issues and debates related to diversity within both academic research and popular culture. The course consists of lecture, discussion, and a substantial amount of hands-on learning through use and analysis of relevant research data.Prerequisites: Psy 3001W or Psy 3001V and Psy 3801 or Psy 3801H. In addition, completion of Psy 3301 is strongly recommended.

PSY5101H - Honors: Personality: Current Theory and Research

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Current theory and research on personality functioning and personality structure. Descriptive, biological, evolutionary, cognitive, developmental, cultural, and narrative perspectives on personality.prereq: Honors Psychology major OR Psychology PhD student

PSY5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Theory/research on social psychology of beliefs/attitudes. Persuasion principles.prereq: 3201 or instr consent

PSY5204 - Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Introduction to interpersonal relationship theory/research findings.prereq: Honors or grad student or instr consent

PSY5205 - Applied Social Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Applications of social psychology research/theory to domains such as physical/mental health, education, the media, desegregation, the legal system, energy conservation, public policy.prereq: 3201 or grad student or instr consent

PSY5206 - Social Psychology and Health Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Survey of social psychological theory/research regarding the processes that shape people's beliefs about health and how these beliefs affect and are affected by their health behavior. Consideration of how theory and evidence regarding these processes informs the development and testing of intervention strategies to promote health behavior change.Prerequisite: Psy 3201

PSY4207 - Personality and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 4207/Psy 5207
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Conceptual/methodological strategies for scientific study of individuals and their social worlds. Applications of theory/research to issues of self, identity, and social interaction.prereq: 3101 or 3201 or honors or grad student or instr consent

PSY5207 - Personality and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 4207/Psy 5207
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Conceptual/methodological strategies for scientific study of individuals and their social worlds. Applications of theory/research to issues of self, identity, and social interaction.prereq: 3101 or 3201 or honors or grad student or instr consent

CPSY3301 - Introduction to Developmental Psychology (SOCS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CPsy 2301/ 3301/ H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. This course is intended for non-Child Psychology/Early Childhood majors. Those majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 2301.

CPSY3301H - Honors Introduction to Developmental Psychology (SOCS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CPsy 2301/ 3301/ H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in developmental psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. This course is intended for University Honors Program students both within and outside of the Developmental Psych/Early Childhood programs.

PSY3121 - History and Systems of Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Survey of the history, methods, and content of modern psychological theory, research, and application. Schools of psychology (e.g., structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology) and central theories of psychology reviewed in their historical and philosophical context.prereq: PSY 1001

PSY3511 - Introduction to Counseling Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

History, theories, and research related to counseling psychology. Development/application of counseling theories to diverse populations. Psychological research on counseling process. Psychological mechanisms that promote change in people's lives.prereq: 1001

PSY3711 - Psychology in the Workplace

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3711/Psy 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Application of psychological theory/research to recruitment, personnel selection, training/development, job design, work group design, work motivation, leadership, performance assessment, job satisfaction measurement.prereq: 1001, [2801/3801 or equiv] or SCO 2550 or instr consent

PSY4501 - Psychology of Women and Gender

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Theory/research regarding psychology of women and psychological sex differences/similarities. Issues unique to women (e.g., pregnancy). Research comparing men/women in terms of personality, abilities, and behavior.prereq: [[Jr or sr], psych major] or instr consent

PSY4521 - Psychology of Stress and Trauma

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course covers the major theories and research findings related to stress and trauma, including the effects of stress and trauma on mental and physical health, factors related to more effective coping with stress/trauma and interventions designed to decrease the negative effects of stress and trauma. Course material will highlight research related to stress and coping with the COVID-19 pandemic. The course focuses on both research methods and personal application of research findings.prereq: PSY 1001 and 3001W or PSY 3001V or CPSY 3308W

PSY5136 - Human Abilities

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Theory, methods, and applications of research in human abilities. Intelligence, aptitude, achievement, specific abilities, information processing/learning and intelligence, aptitude/treatment interactions, and quantitative measurement issues.prereq: [3001W or 3001V], [3135 or 5135], [5862 or equiv] or instr consent

PSY5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Genetic methods for studying human/animal behavior. Emphasizes nature/origin of individual differences in behavior. Twin and adoption methods. Cytogenetics, molecular genetics, linkage/association studies.prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent

PSY5501 - Self, Society and Health - What's Work Got To Do With It?

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Survey of history, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of vocational/occupational health psychology. Burnout, personality, violence, stressors/stress-relations, counter productive behaviors, coping in workplace. Vocational development/assessment, career decision-making/counseling, person-environment fit.prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent

PSY5708 - Organizational Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 5702/5705/5708
Typically offered: Every Spring

Psychological causes of behavior in work organizations. Consequences for individual fulfillment and organizational effectiveness. Individual differences, social perception, motivation, stress, job design, leadership, job satisfaction, teamwork, organizational culture.Prereq: Psy 3001W or 3001V and 3711 OR Psy grad

PSY5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity.prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student

PSY5865 - Advanced Measurement: Theory and Application

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8222/Psy 5865
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Topics in test theory. Classical reliability/validity theory/methods, generalizability theory. Linking, scaling, equating. Item response theory, methods for dichotomous/polytomous responses. Comparisons between classical, item response theory methods in instrument construction.prereq: 5862 or instr consent

PSY5701 - Employee Selection and Staffing

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 5701/Psy 5707
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Application of psychological research/theory to issues in personnel recruitment/selection and to measurement of job performance. Applying principles of individual differences, psychological measurement to decision making in organizations (recruitment, selection, performance appraisal). Prerequisite: Psy 3001W, Psy 3711 or Instructor Permission

PSY5703 - Psychology of Organizational Training and Development

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 5703/Psy 5707
Typically offered: Every Fall

Theories, methods, research, and practice of improving performance of individuals at work through adult learning and instruction, including needs analysis, learning philosophy, models of program and instructional design, theory of knowledge and training transfer, learning analytics, and training evaluation.Prerequisites:PSY 3801 or equivalent

PSY3135 - Introduction to Individual Differences

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/Psy 5135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differential methods in studying human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, social attitudes.prereq: [1001, [3801 or equiv]] or instr consent

PSY5135 - Psychology of Individual Differences

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3135/Psy 5135
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Differential methods in study of human behavior. Psychological traits. Influence of age, sex, heredity, and environment in individual/group differences in ability, personality, interests, and social attitudes.prereq: [3001W or equiv] or [5862 or equiv] or instr consent

PSY3960 - Undergraduate Seminar in Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 45.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Undergraduate seminars in subjects of current interest in psychology.prereq: 1001

PSY3896 - Internship in Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Students first need to secure an internship related to the field of Psychology. Support from Psychology Undergraduate Advising and CLA Career Services is available for this process. Corresponding online coursework includes written goals, journal entries, career development activities, and a culminating paper/project.Credits are variable based on hours at your site: - 1 credit - 45 hour minimum (average 3-4 hours per week) - 2 credit - 90 hour minimum (average 5-7 hours per week) - 3 credit - 135 hour minimum (average 8-9 hours per week) - 4 credit - 180 hour minimum (average 10-12 hours per week). The classwork (journal entries, final paper, etc.) required is increased relative to your credit registration.Students work with their site supervisors to submit a completed internship contract via Handshake in order to register. https://handshake.umn.edu/ -- "Request an Experience".Contact the psyadvis@umn.edu with any questions.A student may only earn credit for a given internship through one course at a time.prereq: Psychology BA or BS major, Department Permission

PSY3993 - Directed Study

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Independent reading leading to paper or to oral or written exam.Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.

PSY3996 - Undergraduate Fieldwork and Internship in Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Supervised fieldwork/internship in community/industry pertinent to formal academic training in psychology.prereq: 1001, instr consent, dept consent

PSY4960 - Seminar in Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring

Seminars in subjects of current interest in Psychology.prereq: [1001, psych major] or instr consent

PSY5960 - Topics in Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer

Special course or seminar. Topics listed in Class Schedule.prereq: PSY 1001, [jr or sr or grad student]

CPSY4994 - Directed Research in Developmental Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Serve as an Research Assistant in an Institute of Child Development faculty lab. Help plan/implement/document scientific studies and gain experience in research methodology. Duties vary based on lab and faculty projects that term, and are individually arranged with corresponding faculty and lab representatives.To register: students must first secure their own placement in a faculty research lab; see ICD website and departmental advisor for assistance. Students then submit completed contract to CPSY advisor for a permission number to register.

PSY4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 48.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed research projects in psychology.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Laboratory instruction and seminars in faculty research areas.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY3901W - Capstone in Psychology - Research Laboratory (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3901W/Psy 3902W/Psy 3903W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

The capstone courses in Psychology synthesize knowledge gained throughout major and create pathways to post-graduation life. Students will reflect on the discipline of psychology and on their experiences in their degree program; class and small group discussions will support this reflection. Students will be provided with access to professionals who are alumni of the psychology program and will have the opportunity to hear these career professionals speak about their varied career paths and to network with them for advice and connections to other professionals. Students will also receive important information regarding graduate school and career preparation from the Psychology Advising Office and CLA Career Services.In this course, you will draw from your experience in a faculty research lab (PSY 4/5993) to help develop the topic of your major project paper. Students complete a research paper based on activities in the lab, or a literature review if the lab did not complete empirical work. Before class begins students must secure a laboratory research experience in a faculty member's lab for PSY 4/5993 credits or enroll in the PSY 5993 class, either the semester prior to or concurrently with your PSY 3901W enrollment. Because research lab positions are not guaranteed, we recommend BA students only select this option if they already have a PSY 4/5993 position secured. prereq: [3801 or equiv], 3001W, completion of five courses from three distribution areas, PSY major, senior

CPSY4994 - Directed Research in Developmental Psychology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Serve as an Research Assistant in an Institute of Child Development faculty lab. Help plan/implement/document scientific studies and gain experience in research methodology. Duties vary based on lab and faculty projects that term, and are individually arranged with corresponding faculty and lab representatives.To register: students must first secure their own placement in a faculty research lab; see ICD website and departmental advisor for assistance. Students then submit completed contract to CPSY advisor for a permission number to register.

PSY4993 - Directed Research: Special Areas of Psychology and Related Sciences

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 48.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed research projects in psychology.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology

Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Laboratory instruction and seminars in faculty research areas.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY4994V - Honors Research Practicum (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Practical experience conducting psychological research. Preparation for completion of honors thesis. Research ethics, practical aspects of conducting psychological research, writing research reports. Students assist faculty and advanced graduate students in research.prereq: [3001W or 3001V], psych major, honors

PSY4902V - Honors Project (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Critical literature review or empirical study.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY3001V - Honors Introduction to Research Methods (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims.prereq: [1001, [2081/3801 or equiv]]or dept consent, PSY major, honors student

PSY3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims.prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent

PSY3901W - Capstone in Psychology - Research Laboratory (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3901W/Psy 3902W/Psy 3903W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

The capstone courses in Psychology synthesize knowledge gained throughout major and create pathways to post-graduation life. Students will reflect on the discipline of psychology and on their experiences in their degree program; class and small group discussions will support this reflection. Students will be provided with access to professionals who are alumni of the psychology program and will have the opportunity to hear these career professionals speak about their varied career paths and to network with them for advice and connections to other professionals. Students will also receive important information regarding graduate school and career preparation from the Psychology Advising Office and CLA Career Services.In this course, you will draw from your experience in a faculty research lab (PSY 4/5993) to help develop the topic of your major project paper. Students complete a research paper based on activities in the lab, or a literature review if the lab did not complete empirical work. Before class begins students must secure a laboratory research experience in a faculty member's lab for PSY 4/5993 credits or enroll in the PSY 5993 class, either the semester prior to or concurrently with your PSY 3901W enrollment. Because research lab positions are not guaranteed, we recommend BA students only select this option if they already have a PSY 4/5993 position secured. prereq: [3801 or equiv], 3001W, completion of five courses from three distribution areas, PSY major, senior

PSY3902W - Capstone in Psychology - Individual Interests (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3901W/Psy 3902W/Psy 3903W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

The capstone courses in Psychology synthesize knowledge gained throughout major and create pathways to post-graduation life. Students will reflect on the discipline of psychology and on their experiences in their degree program; class and small group discussions will support this reflection. Students will be provided with access to professionals who are alumni of the psychology program and will have the opportunity to hear these career professionals speak about their varied career paths and to network with them for advice and connections to other professionals. Students will also receive important information regarding graduate school and career preparation from the Psychology Advising Office and CLA Career Services.In this course, you will develop a project that relates to your personal or occupational interests. It includes extra reading or contact with people working in your area of interest. The most common way to satisfy this requirement is to read a book written by a psychologist for a general audience or to interview at least three professionals working in your area of interest. Other ideas may be discussed with the course instructor.prereq: [3801 or equiv], 3001W, completion of five courses from three distribution areas, PSY major, senior

PSY4902V - Honors Project (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Critical literature review or empirical study.prereq: instr consent, dept consent

PSY4994V - Honors Research Practicum (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Practical experience conducting psychological research. Preparation for completion of honors thesis. Research ethics, practical aspects of conducting psychological research, writing research reports. Students assist faculty and advanced graduate students in research.prereq: [3001W or 3001V], psych major, honors

PSY5031W - Perception (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5031
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Topics include color vision, pattern vision, image formation in the eye, object recognition, reading, and impaired vision.prereq: 3031 or 3051 or instr consent

PSY5036W - Computational Vision (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year

Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control.prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent

PSY5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory.prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent

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